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3rd April 2020

RFU Confirmed Newcastle Falconsí promotion to the Gallagher Premiership for the 2020-21 season


Semore in the Telegraph
Discussion started by markismith50 , 01 August, 2020 10:08
Semore in the Telegraph
markismith50 01 August, 2020 10:08
Chairman Semore Kurdi interviewed by the Daily Telegraph [www.telegraph.co.uk]

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
FalcDancer 01 August, 2020 10:46
Caught this on social media
A nice piece of insight into the clubs struggles during COVID19. Honesty from Semore, I sense that Semore and the club have things under control but only due to the sacrifice of everyone at the club

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
pityacker 01 August, 2020 11:37
Itís behind a paywall.

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
markismith50 01 August, 2020 12:13
You can register and get it for free, but always worth remembering that journalism has value and costs money to produce.

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
SimonG19 01 August, 2020 12:17
Quote:
markismith50
You can register and get it for free, but always worth remembering that journalism has value and costs money to produce.

I'd agree that some journalism has value Mark!

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
DocA27 01 August, 2020 12:52
Good read. Very heartening to read how open all players, staff and partners were to helping out. It should definitely bring the whole club closer together because they all dug in together. And it sounds like things are much more secure and stable and a plan is in place for the future.
Always refreshing to hear this level of honesty and openness from Semore. The bloke always talks sense and doesn't BS, which is rare in sport nowadays!

And never complain about paying for journalism! Especially nowadays!

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
dick g 01 August, 2020 13:44
I find this support for the craft I exercised for 50 years most encouraging. Journalism is going through troubled times and needs support. And agree with comments on SK and the club. The fact that it still feels like a club speaks volumes.

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
FalcDancer 01 August, 2020 13:56
Quote:
pityacker
Itís behind a paywall.

I read the whole article, I havenít registered for an account to my knowledge

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
dick g 01 August, 2020 15:39
Quote:
markismith50
Chairman Semore Kurdi interviewed by the Daily Telegraph [www.telegraph.co.uk]

Tried without success to get to read this piece. Can anybody let me have it somehow?

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
Monkey1 01 August, 2020 15:46
Quote:
markismith50
always worth remembering that journalism has value and costs money to produce.

And there lies the problem. People want everything for free these days.

People used to buy, that is they paid money, to read newspapers, and as a result those newspapers made money, and a a result the newspapers employed people who could make newspapers worth reading.

All the national papers were worth reading, no matter what their political or other slant, because at their core they had quality journalists who knew their craft. The papers were good because they used to compete with each other to employ the best journalists. Now they are shedding journalists by the hundred, replaced by cheap internet trawlers who are tasked with turning banal but free tripe from social media, into banal but free tripe on their online platforms. There are some good journalists left who will come up with articles like the interview with Semore, but unfortunately they are a dying breed.

Local papers were superb, and I used to enjoy reading them as I travelled around the country. Even if you had never heard of the subject matter, the quality of writing was good, so it made a good read.

In Newcastle city centre every afternoon you would hear 'hurronigail' and you would stick your hand in your pocket to buy a Chronicle to read on the way home. It was good because in Thomson House were journalists with a vast knowledge of specialist expertise between them, feature writers, photographers, illustrators, picture editors. sub-editors, and a whole team who made a quality paper. All of that has gone because people no longer put their hands in their pockets, and the shadow of what once was is sustained by an audience who are content with clickbait to direct them at cheap online advertising. But hey, it's free, so who cares!

You got out at the right time Dick. I used to love visiting Thomson House, it had a buzz about it, now there is nothing left to visit, just a satellite office of Reach PLC which prints more P45s than papers these days, all because people want stuff for free. As you said, it was a craft, but as people decide not to pay for it anymore, the craftsmen can no longer practise their craft, and the world is poorer for it. Next time people criticise modern journalism, they should stop for a moment and consider who is responsible for the decline of what was once a great industry, much enjoyed by many.

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
dick g 01 August, 2020 16:35
Quote:
dick g
Quote:
markismith50
Chairman Semore Kurdi interviewed by the Daily Telegraph [www.telegraph.co.uk]

Tried without success to get to read this piece. Can anybody let me have it somehow?

Finally managed to get the wretched logorythm to let me in so I have read the piece. Nothing especially new, but reassuring confidence that our owner thinks we have a future.

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
dick g 01 August, 2020 16:50
Quote:
dick g
Quote:
markismith50
Chairman Semore Kurdi interviewed by the Daily Telegraph [www.telegraph.co.uk]

Tried without success to get to read this piece. Can anybody let me have it somehow?

Finally managed to get the wretched logorythm to let me in so I have read the piece. Nothing especially new, but reassuring confidence that our owner thinks we have a future.

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
dick g 01 August, 2020 17:23
My final observation on this thread. Positive interviews with SK in the Tele and DR in Times. Cracking job Smithy.

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
saruman 01 August, 2020 18:16
Quote:
markismith50
You can register and get it for free, but always worth remembering that journalism has value and costs money to produce.
You donít get it for free because you have registered. Eventually youíll have to pay.

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
dick g 01 August, 2020 20:17
Quote:
Monkey1
Quote:
markismith50
always worth remembering that journalism has value and costs money to produce.

And there lies the problem. People want everything for free these days.

People used to buy, that is they paid money, to read newspapers, and as a result those newspapers made money, and a a result the newspapers employed people who could make newspapers worth reading.


All the national papers were worth reading, no matter what their political or other slant, because at their core they had quality journalists who knew their craft. The papers were good because they used to compete with each other to employ the best journalists. Now they are shedding journalists by the hundred, replaced by cheap internet trawlers who are tasked with turning banal but free tripe from social media, into banal but free tripe on their online platforms. There are some good journalists left who will come up with articles like the interview with Semore, but unfortunately they are a dying breed.

Local papers were superb, and I used to enjoy reading them as I travelled around the country. Even if you had never heard of the subject matter, the quality of writing was good, so it made a good read.

In Newcastle city centre every afternoon you would hear 'hurronigail' and you would stick your hand in your pocket to buy a Chronicle to read on the way home. It was good because in Thomson House were journalists with a vast knowledge of specialist expertise between them, feature writers, photographers, illustrators, picture editors. sub-editors, and a whole team who made a quality paper. All of that has gone because people no longer put their hands in their pockets, and the shadow of what once was is sustained by an audience who are content with clickbait to direct them at cheap online advertising. But hey, it's free, so who cares!

You got out at the right time Dick. I used to love visiting Thomson House, it had a buzz about it, now there is nothing left to visit, just a satellite office of Reach PLC which prints more P45s than papers these days, all because people want stuff for free. As you said, it was a craft, but as people decide not to pay for it anymore, the craftsmen can no longer practise their craft, and the world is poorer for it. Next time people criticise modern journalism, they should stop for a moment and consider who is responsible for the decline of what was once a great industry, much enjoyed by many.

Thanks Monk. I am glad I was at Thomson House in the 80s and 90s when the papers were at their best
And let"s not forget the presence there of a couple of first rate Rugby writers, Alan Hedley and Duncan Madsen who have the Falcons proper coverage.

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
markismith50 01 August, 2020 22:05
Hi Saruman, you get one article per week free by registering.

Hi Dick. Yes, Hedders and Madman were both good blokes and fine journos. They were good friends to me when I first started in the job, and I miss them.

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
limpopo 02 August, 2020 11:58
Perhaps the demise of the newspaper industry can be blamed on many things, amongst which perhaps a certain Mr Murdoch?

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
SimonG19 02 August, 2020 12:49
Quote:
Monkey1
Quote:
markismith50
always worth remembering that journalism has value and costs money to produce.

And there lies the problem. People want everything for free these days.

People used to buy, that is they paid money, to read newspapers, and as a result those newspapers made money, and a a result the newspapers employed people who could make newspapers worth reading.

All the national papers were worth reading, no matter what their political or other slant, because at their core they had quality journalists who knew their craft. The papers were good because they used to compete with each other to employ the best journalists. Now they are shedding journalists by the hundred, replaced by cheap internet trawlers who are tasked with turning banal but free tripe from social media, into banal but free tripe on their online platforms. There are some good journalists left who will come up with articles like the interview with Semore, but unfortunately they are a dying breed.

Local papers were superb, and I used to enjoy reading them as I travelled around the country. Even if you had never heard of the subject matter, the quality of writing was good, so it made a good read.

In Newcastle city centre every afternoon you would hear 'hurronigail' and you would stick your hand in your pocket to buy a Chronicle to read on the way home. It was good because in Thomson House were journalists with a vast knowledge of specialist expertise between them, feature writers, photographers, illustrators, picture editors. sub-editors, and a whole team who made a quality paper. All of that has gone because people no longer put their hands in their pockets, and the shadow of what once was is sustained by an audience who are content with clickbait to direct them at cheap online advertising. But hey, it's free, so who cares!

You got out at the right time Dick. I used to love visiting Thomson House, it had a buzz about it, now there is nothing left to visit, just a satellite office of Reach PLC which prints more P45s than papers these days, all because people want stuff for free. As you said, it was a craft, but as people decide not to pay for it anymore, the craftsmen can no longer practise their craft, and the world is poorer for it. Next time people criticise modern journalism, they should stop for a moment and consider who is responsible for the decline of what was once a great industry, much enjoyed by many.

I entirely agree.

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
aidanb 02 August, 2020 15:37
Quote:
Monkey1
Quote:
markismith50
always worth remembering that journalism has value and costs money to produce.

And there lies the problem. People want everything for free these days.

People used to buy, that is they paid money, to read newspapers, and as a result those newspapers made money, and a a result the newspapers employed people who could make newspapers worth reading.

All the national papers were worth reading, no matter what their political or other slant, because at their core they had quality journalists who knew their craft. The papers were good because they used to compete with each other to employ the best journalists. Now they are shedding journalists by the hundred, replaced by cheap internet trawlers who are tasked with turning banal but free tripe from social media, into banal but free tripe on their online platforms. There are some good journalists left who will come up with articles like the interview with Semore, but unfortunately they are a dying breed.

Local papers were superb, and I used to enjoy reading them as I travelled around the country. Even if you had never heard of the subject matter, the quality of writing was good, so it made a good read.

In Newcastle city centre every afternoon you would hear 'hurronigail' and you would stick your hand in your pocket to buy a Chronicle to read on the way home. It was good because in Thomson House were journalists with a vast knowledge of specialist expertise between them, feature writers, photographers, illustrators, picture editors. sub-editors, and a whole team who made a quality paper. All of that has gone because people no longer put their hands in their pockets, and the shadow of what once was is sustained by an audience who are content with clickbait to direct them at cheap online advertising. But hey, it's free, so who cares!

You got out at the right time Dick. I used to love visiting Thomson House, it had a buzz about it, now there is nothing left to visit, just a satellite office of Reach PLC which prints more P45s than papers these days, all because people want stuff for free. As you said, it was a craft, but as people decide not to pay for it anymore, the craftsmen can no longer practise their craft, and the world is poorer for it. Next time people criticise modern journalism, they should stop for a moment and consider who is responsible for the decline of what was once a great industry, much enjoyed by many.

I thoroughly disagree with a lot of what you have said.

There are some very very good journalists who practiced their skills very well.

However.

There are also (and they are still about) a lot of pieces of @#$%& who did things like break into peoples voice mails etc.

The press can be a good thing but there are plenty who are there to manipulate and dictate.

Letís not forget a good proportion of then were paid to write things which portrayed an image and not reality.

Rant over (for now)

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
aidanb 02 August, 2020 15:43
Sorry Monkey

Iím going to correct myself.

I disagree with some of what you have said rather than a lot of what you said.

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
Robs 02 August, 2020 20:15
Quote:
dick g
let"s not forget the presence there of a couple of first rate Rugby writers, Alan Hedley and Duncan Madsen .


And prior to them, John Pargeter

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
markismith50 02 August, 2020 20:57
I never had the pleasure of meeting John, but Iíve heard tales of his legend.

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
Leipziger 03 August, 2020 08:02
Quote:
aidanb
Quote:
Monkey1
Quote:
markismith50
always worth remembering that journalism has value and costs money to produce.

And there lies the problem. People want everything for free these days.

People used to buy, that is they paid money, to read newspapers, and as a result those newspapers made money, and a a result the newspapers employed people who could make newspapers worth reading.

All the national papers were worth reading, no matter what their political or other slant, because at their core they had quality journalists who knew their craft. The papers were good because they used to compete with each other to employ the best journalists. Now they are shedding journalists by the hundred, replaced by cheap internet trawlers who are tasked with turning banal but free tripe from social media, into banal but free tripe on their online platforms. There are some good journalists left who will come up with articles like the interview with Semore, but unfortunately they are a dying breed.

Local papers were superb, and I used to enjoy reading them as I travelled around the country. Even if you had never heard of the subject matter, the quality of writing was good, so it made a good read.

In Newcastle city centre every afternoon you would hear 'hurronigail' and you would stick your hand in your pocket to buy a Chronicle to read on the way home. It was good because in Thomson House were journalists with a vast knowledge of specialist expertise between them, feature writers, photographers, illustrators, picture editors. sub-editors, and a whole team who made a quality paper. All of that has gone because people no longer put their hands in their pockets, and the shadow of what once was is sustained by an audience who are content with clickbait to direct them at cheap online advertising. But hey, it's free, so who cares!

You got out at the right time Dick. I used to love visiting Thomson House, it had a buzz about it, now there is nothing left to visit, just a satellite office of Reach PLC which prints more P45s than papers these days, all because people want stuff for free. As you said, it was a craft, but as people decide not to pay for it anymore, the craftsmen can no longer practise their craft, and the world is poorer for it. Next time people criticise modern journalism, they should stop for a moment and consider who is responsible for the decline of what was once a great industry, much enjoyed by many.

I thoroughly disagree with a lot of what you have said.

There are some very very good journalists who practiced their skills very well.

However.

There are also (and they are still about) a lot of pieces of @#$%& who did things like break into peoples voice mails etc.

The press can be a good thing but there are plenty who are there to manipulate and dictate.

Letís not forget a good proportion of then were paid to write things which portrayed an image and not reality.

Rant over (for now)

As usual, there's some good and some bad.

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
FalcDancer 03 August, 2020 09:06
There was also an interview with Dean in the Times over the weekend as well
Again behind a paywall but you can read for free with the same terms as the Semore article

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
markismith50 03 August, 2020 09:37
Deano Times link [www.thetimes.co.uk]

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
dick g 03 August, 2020 10:01
Didn't intend to extend this thread too far away from the game, but as it has I feel it might be useful if I added a bit more.

One of the main reasons for the decline in old-style journalism is the curse of digitalis. Many papers now direct their attention to their websites. In the Eldon Square newsroom of the Chron and Journal, a large screen is suspended from the ceiling. It lists stories running on-line by the number of hits they get.

The goal, then, is to get stories that attract the greatest number of hits and move up the Hit Parade. Hence the overwhelmi g prsesence of crime and human interest stories.

Combined with the need to keep the web-site "up to date", this means that what we find is information rather than news. Often, this is in the form of hastily re-written press releases.

Real journalism takes time. Digitalis doesn't permit this. Even with firewalls, digital news outlets do not generate enough cash to pay for real journalism. Staffs are reduced. Quality goes.

On Thursday week, I shall host one of the regular meetings of what we call the Hot Metal Mob. This is an opportunity for retired old hacks who once worked together to ramble on about how much better things were in our days. Because they were.

I'll go away now.......

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
aidanb 03 August, 2020 15:40
Quote:
Leipziger
Quote:
aidanb
Quote:
Monkey1
Quote:
markismith50
always worth remembering that journalism has value and costs money to produce.

And there lies the problem. People want everything for free these days.

People used to buy, that is they paid money, to read newspapers, and as a result those newspapers made money, and a a result the newspapers employed people who could make newspapers worth reading.

All the national papers were worth reading, no matter what their political or other slant, because at their core they had quality journalists who knew their craft. The papers were good because they used to compete with each other to employ the best journalists. Now they are shedding journalists by the hundred, replaced by cheap internet trawlers who are tasked with turning banal but free tripe from social media, into banal but free tripe on their online platforms. There are some good journalists left who will come up with articles like the interview with Semore, but unfortunately they are a dying breed.

Local papers were superb, and I used to enjoy reading them as I travelled around the country. Even if you had never heard of the subject matter, the quality of writing was good, so it made a good read.

In Newcastle city centre every afternoon you would hear 'hurronigail' and you would stick your hand in your pocket to buy a Chronicle to read on the way home. It was good because in Thomson House were journalists with a vast knowledge of specialist expertise between them, feature writers, photographers, illustrators, picture editors. sub-editors, and a whole team who made a quality paper. All of that has gone because people no longer put their hands in their pockets, and the shadow of what once was is sustained by an audience who are content with clickbait to direct them at cheap online advertising. But hey, it's free, so who cares!

You got out at the right time Dick. I used to love visiting Thomson House, it had a buzz about it, now there is nothing left to visit, just a satellite office of Reach PLC which prints more P45s than papers these days, all because people want stuff for free. As you said, it was a craft, but as people decide not to pay for it anymore, the craftsmen can no longer practise their craft, and the world is poorer for it. Next time people criticise modern journalism, they should stop for a moment and consider who is responsible for the decline of what was once a great industry, much enjoyed by many.

I thoroughly disagree with a lot of what you have said.

There are some very very good journalists who practiced their skills very well.

However.

There are also (and they are still about) a lot of pieces of @#$%& who did things like break into peoples voice mails etc.

The press can be a good thing but there are plenty who are there to manipulate and dictate.

Letís not forget a good proportion of then were paid to write things which portrayed an image and not reality.

Rant over (for now)

As usual, there's some good and some bad.

agreed

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
aidanb 03 August, 2020 15:41
Quote:
dick g
Didn't intend to extend this thread too far away from the game, but as it has I feel it might be useful if I added a bit more.
One of the main reasons for the decline in old-style journalism is the curse of digitalis. Many papers now direct their attention to their websites. In the Eldon Square newsroom of the Chron and Journal, a large screen is suspended from the ceiling. It lists stories running on-line by the number of hits they get.

The goal, then, is to get stories that attract the greatest number of hits and move up the Hit Parade. Hence the overwhelmi g prsesence of crime and human interest stories.

Combined with the need to keep the web-site "up to date", this means that what we find is information rather than news. Often, this is in the form of hastily re-written press releases.

Real journalism takes time. Digitalis doesn't permit this. Even with firewalls, digital news outlets do not generate enough cash to pay for real journalism. Staffs are reduced. Quality goes.

On Thursday week, I shall host one of the regular meetings of what we call the Hot Metal Mob. This is an opportunity for retired old hacks who once worked together to ramble on about how much better things were in our days. Because they were.

I'll go away now.......

Don't go away

you make a while heap of valid points

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
Exiled Falcon 03 August, 2020 17:19
Iím not a huge fan of the press in this country although admit there are good and bad. Problem is a large proportion of the population of this country are obsessed with, to put it politely, cack. Thereís an obsession with celebrity and an even bigger obsession with social media. Unfortunately a lot of the press basically now reflects that.

Re: Semore in the Telegraph
Monkey1 04 August, 2020 08:27
All summed up very nicely by a Mr Paul Weller a long time ago EF:

The public wants what the public gets.


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