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Re: Article about Kearnan Myall
SimonG19 21 August, 2019 16:17
Quote:
Petergwilson
Actually I do but thanks for making an assumption based on nothing but your own self righteousness.

Oh dear again.

(Has it dawned on you yet that the comment was based on what you actually posted?).

Re: Article about Kearnan Myall
wombles222 21 August, 2019 22:27
Quote:
backdoc
A small point. There is a difference between reactive depression and endogenous depression. We don’t know the background but cannot assume that events have triggered this.

Could not agree more backdoc! a short statement that reflects how complex mental health is!

Re: Article about Kearnan Myall
Skippy 21 August, 2019 23:23
Its hard not to imagine that the players will feel financial stress. A great number turn professional in their late teens, forgoing the opportunity to go to university. They then enter a world where, if they’re lucky, they get pretty well paid on a monthly basis. But they’re most likely reach retirement in their early to mid 30s, if injury does not curtail their careers before then. And any insurance they may have will likely be fairly rudimentary unless they’re getting regular intentional caps. The reality is that their expected lifetime earnings (ie, by the time they hit 66+) is not all that great.

Re: Article about Kearnan Myall
Statesman 22 August, 2019 18:35
Quote:
Skippy
Its hard not to imagine that the players will feel financial stress. A great number turn professional in their late teens, forgoing the opportunity to go to university. They then enter a world where, if they’re lucky, they get pretty well paid on a monthly basis. But they’re most likely reach retirement in their early to mid 30s, if injury does not curtail their careers before then. And any insurance they may have will likely be fairly rudimentary unless they’re getting regular intentional caps. The reality is that their expected lifetime earnings (ie, by the time they hit 66+) is not all that great.

I think you are in danger of conflating 2 very different issues. Financial stress is something that most of us will face at some stage. One could argue that professional rugby players have a lower propensity to suffer given the shape of their earnings capacity (it's front loaded whereas most of us have it the other way round).

I don't know how much an average Prem player gets paid but let's assume it's £200k per annum and they have 10 year career at this level. Average earnings in the UK are £30k per annum - so let's assume they revert to this level for the rest of their working life (I would argue they have greater earnings potential than this given their work ethic and socioeconomic background, and they also have plenty of time on their hands which could be used to develop post rugby skills). In this scenario their career earnings are more than double the average UK career earnings.

Additionally, let's not forget that professional sportspeople are doing what most of us could only dream about doing. They are paid to do something they are passionate about doing - I suspect that not everyone on this forum can say that.

Turning to the broader issue of clinical depression, many thx to Wombles and others for the great insights they have provided. KM does Society a great favour by talking so frankly about these issues - well done him. I had a member of my leadership team who suffered similar issues and I was staggered by the prejudice that I observed around the stakeholders in the business - their behaviours would have been completely different had the individual had a heart attack or similar - quite shocking really.

Re: Article about Kearnan Myall
SarrieSaint 29 August, 2019 18:05
Quote:
Statesman
let's not forget that professional sportspeople are doing what most of us could only dream about doing. They are paid to do something they are passionate about doing - I suspect that not everyone on this forum can say that.

I wonder if the %s for sport people in terms of job satisfaction are significantly higher than in a "normal" job? I can't imagine anything better than being paid to play rugby but I suspect it being your job does change that dynamic. I am quite surprised when listening to a number of rugby players including Marker and your own Haskell that it's fairly clear that it's simply a job rather than something they are wildly passionate about.

As for Myall, well done to him. I always feel it's quite brave to stick your head over the parapet in this way especially in a sport that is still quite constrained by out-dated ideals of what "manliness" is. I wish him all the best for his future.

Re: Article about Kearnan Myall
westwaleswasp 30 August, 2019 16:50
Unless it brings mega wealth, paparazzi and security guards on your Cheshire mansion it will surely be another job? I know in the 80s people who did a sideline for fun - programing 8 bits and selling games and eventually their hobby became their job. Many gave up before that because they knew that eventually doing something for fun professionally isn't actually fun. I know people whose hobby in both table top gaming and collectables/comics and have turned it into their job, and really, to them it is just a job with up and downsides.
My hobby as a sideline has a monthly turnover of 4 to 500, enough for me to go part time teaching at least but if it starts to feel like a second job I ease back.
Playing rugby or cricket professionally might be a dream but the reality will be anything but for most.

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